#T1DLOOKSLIKEME

If you have T1D or know someone who does, help us raise awareness this November. Join us in showing the world what T1D looks like.

National Diabetes Awareness Month

T1D looks like the 1.25 million Americans living with this disease and the 5 million who are expected to have it by 2050 if we don’t do something now.

MYTH:

It's easy for people with T1D to manage their blood- sugar levels.

MYTH:

It's easy for people with T1D to manage their blood- sugar levels.

FACT:

Maintaining optimal control of blood sugar levels can be very difficult with T1D. Many factors including stress and exercise can easily cause blood sugars to swing out of control. Regardless of striving for tight control and following their healthcare provider’s plan, T1D produces fluctuations in blood sugars; fluctuations don’t mean the person with T1D is doing something wrong. There is no “perfect” with T1D.

MYTH:

Insulin is a cure for diabetes.

MYTH:

Insulin is a cure for diabetes.

FACT:

Insulin is used to manage blood sugar, it is not a cure. People with T1D must carefully balance their insulin doses, either with injections or a pump, with eating and daily activities every day. Even with insulin, it is a daily struggle to manage T1D.

MYTH:

Only kids get T1D.

MYTH:

Only kids get T1D.

FACT:

T1D, formerly known as “juvenile” or “juvenile onset” diabetes, strikes both children and adults at any age. In fact, 84% of people living with T1D are adults. You can never outgrow it, no matter when you are diagnosed.

MYTH:

Diabetes is caused by obesity or eating too much sugar.

MYTH:

Diabetes is caused by obesity or eating too much sugar.

FACT:

While obesity has been identified as one of the “triggers” for type 2 diabetes, it has no relation to the cause of T1D. Scientists do not yet know exactly what causes T1D, but they believe that both genetic and environmental factors are involved. Eating too much sugar is not a factor.

MYTH:

People with diabetes can't participate in athletics.

MYTH:

People with diabetes can't participate in athletics.

FACT:

Physical exercise is important for everyone’s health and is especially important for people living with T1D. Regular exercise helps to lower blood-sugar levels and keep them in the target range. There are athletes who have T1D and are very successful in their careers—anything is possible!

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