nPOD News Update

In December 2012, a study published in The Journal of the American Medical Association reported that people with type 1 diabetes (T1D) or who are at increased risk of developing the disease have smaller pancreases than people not at risk. Researchers studied pancreases from three groups of deceased donors: individuals with T1D, those with autoantibodies […]

FDA Approves Lucentis to Treat Diabetic Macular Edema

For many people who have experienced diabetic macular edema (DME), the future looks a little clearer. On August 10, 2012, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved use of the drug Lucentis for the treatment of DME. Developed by Genentech, Lucentis is the first and only FDA-approved medicine for the condition. Diabetic macular edema […]

JDRF Discusses New Treatment for Diabetic Eye Disease

Developing effective treatments for diabetic retinopathy is a key part of JDRF’s research goals. Until recently, the only treatment for diabetic macular edema was with lasers that often halted the worsening of the condition but did not improve a person’s eyesight. Now, however, a promising new treatment has emerged in the form of a drug called Lucentis (known generically as ranibizumab).

50-Year Medalist Study Shows Positive Results

In the JDRF-funded Medalist Study of individuals who have lived with T1D for at least 50 years, researchers have discovered that some Medalists are protected from advanced diabetic retinopathy because they have a slow rate of retinopathy onset or progression. Further, after 20 years of T1D, progression of retinopathy appears to halt. Researchers can now search for factors that mediate this slow disease progression and exploit them to develop new strategies to prevent or treat diabetic retinopathy.

nPOD Update

By Michelle A. Cissell, Ph.D.   In 2007, JDRF took a calculated risk by creating the Network for Pancreatic Organ Donors with Diabetes (nPOD) to collect and distribute pancreatic and other tissues from deceased organ donors with type 1 diabetes (T1D), as well as from those without the disease but with multiple antibodies indicating high […]

Study Aims to Protect Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes from Kidney and Heart Complications

JDRF and the Canadian government are expanding the Adolescent Type 1 Diabetes Cardio-Renal (heart and kidney) Intervention Trial (AdDIT) by adding one additional clinical site in southern Ontario, Canada. The expansion will serve to accelerate the recruitment of adolescents with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and microalbuminuria, a condition in which a protein called albumin leaks into the urine—a sign of early kidney disease and a risk factor for developing heart disease later in life.

Lucentis for Diabetic Eye Disease

Genentech, Inc., a member of the Roche Group, announced that its second Phase III study known as RISE, which is evaluating the drug Lucentis in patients with diabetic macular edema, met its primary clinical endpoint. Results showed that after 24 months, a significantly higher percentage of patients receiving monthly injections of Lucentis experienced improved vision […]

Retinopathy Basics Q&A: What You Need to Know

Q: What is diabetic retinopathy? A: Diabetic retinopathy is the most common diabetic eye disease and a leading cause of blindness in American adults. Diabetic retinopathy is a progressive disease that destroys small blood vessels in the retina, eventually causing vision problems. In its most advanced form–proliferative retinopathy–it can cause blindness. According to the National […]

Seeing the Future

and John McIntosh Retinopathy, a common complication of diabetes, develops because of gradual changes to the retina—a delicate, light-sensitive membrane lining the inner eyeball that is connected to the brain via the optic nerve. When diabetic retinopathy (DR) goes untreated, it can compromise the retina, impair vision and cause blindness. The sight-damaging changes to the […]