Sleeping Without Fear

Study: Artificial pancreas systems with predictive low-glucose-suspend help reduce overnight hypoglycemia in individuals with type 1 diabetes Bedtime may soon be safer and a lot less anxiety filled for people with type 1 diabetes (T1D) thanks to software being developed as a next-step component for artificial pancreas systems. Called predictive low-glucose-suspend (pLGS), it interacts with […]

Curled, Coiled, and Counterpoised

The technology on which many people rely for blood-glucose management?with all the tubes, infusion sets, and delicate circuitry?can really get in the way of executing proper yoga poses. For anyone who may have shied away from yoga for these reasons, take heart. Many people with T1D have mastered Monkey Pose and gone deep into Downward Dog—all while comfortably sporting an insulin pump.

Progress in Testing Artificial Pancreas Systems in Clinical and Real-World Settings

A first-of-its-kind clinical pilot study has demonstrated the safety and feasibility of an artificial pancreas system in an outpatient, “real-world” setting. A second clinical study has shown that a hypoglycemia-hyperglycemia minimizer system can predict when blood-glucose levels are about to rise or fall and make appropriate adjustments in insulin delivery. These JDRF-supported studies represent critical steps on the path to a functional artificial pancreas for the benefit of people living with T1D.

Researchers Formulate Stable Liquid Glucagon

JDRF-funded researchers have developed a formulation of liquid glucagon that remains stable and viable for long periods of time and thus may be usable in standard diabetes pumps. The research represents advancement toward the routine delivery of glucagon for people with T1D and may also facilitate the development of bihormonal closed-loop artificial pancreas systems.

JDRF Partners With Dexcom to Support the Manufacture of a Smart Transmitter Prototype for Artificial Pancreas Research

JDRF has partnered with San Diego–based medical company Dexcom, Inc. to support the manufacture of a so-called smart transmitter prototype, which will be available for research purposes before it will be commercially available. The technological advance not only would reduce the number of devices a person would have to wear with an artificial pancreas system, but would also enable wireless connectivity among these devices—an important feature that would give people with T1D the freedom of movement while participating in real-life outpatient studies.

Letter from Leadership:  Scott McCormick

Letter from Leadership: Scott McCormick

Countdown is written and produced by our Marketing and Communications team here at JDRF. As the leader of the team and JDRF’s chief marketing officer, I am pleased to bring our new issue to you. We have so much news and information to share—and it is our hope that you will share it with everyone you […]

My Story: Planning a healthy pregnancy with type 1 diabetes

People with type 1 diabetes (T1D) are often told “no.” We hear the long list of things we shouldn’t eat, and shouldn’t do, and shouldn’t even think about trying. For things outside of managing my T1D, I subscribe to the concept of “asking forgiveness, not permission.” (Like when I pierced my belly button when I […]

Another Study Documents the Benefits of CGM

Continuous glucose monitors are more than simply devices of convenience for people with diabetes—they are tools that can substantially improve blood sugar control in people of all ages when used regularly, without increasing the risk of dangerous low blood sugar. The growing evidence of the benefits of CGM underscores the importance of continued research into a closed-loop artificial pancreas, a system that uses CGM data to automatically deliver the right amount of insulin through a pump.

Four Separate Publications Document the Benefits of CGM

Continuous glucose monitors are more than simply devices of convenience for people with diabetes—they are tools that can substantially improve blood sugar control in people of all ages when used regularly, without increasing the risk of dangerous low blood sugar. The growing evidence of the benefits of CGM underscores the importance of continued research into a closed-loop artificial pancreas, a system that uses CGM data to automatically deliver the right amount of insulin through a pump.